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Are Your Brakes Trying to Tell You Something?

May 21, 2018 / 0 Comments / 37 / Blog

If your brakes are trying to tell you something, you should pay attention. A properly operating brake system helps ensure safe vehicle control and operation and it should be checked immediately if you suspect any problems, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

“While an annual brake inspection is a good way to ensure brake safety, motorists should not ignore signs that their brakes need attention,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Knowing the key warning signs that your brakes may need maintenance will go a long way toward keeping you and others safe on the road.”

The Car Care Council reminds motorists to look for the following warning signs that their brakes need to be inspected:

  • Noise: screeching, grinding or clicking noises when applying the brakes.
  • Pulling: vehicle pulls to one side while braking.
  • Low Pedal: brake pedal nearly touches the floor before engaging.
  • Hard Pedal: must apply extreme pressure to the pedal before brakes engage.
  • Grabbing: brakes grab at the slightest touch to the pedal.
  • Vibration: brake pedal vibrates or pulses, even under normal braking conditions.
  • Light: brake light is illuminated on your vehicle’s dashboard.

Because brakes are a normal wear item on any vehicle, they will eventually need to be replaced. Factors that can affect brake wear include driving habits, operating conditions, vehicle type and the quality of the brake lining material. Be sure to avoid letting brakes get to the ‘metal-to-metal’ point as that can mean expensive rotor or drum replacement.

 

Source: Car Care Council

Tips to Prolong Your Car Battery’s Life

April 6, 2018 / 0 Comments / 78 / Blog

The first thing you should know is that a car battery’s lifespan is fixed and there’s nothing you can do to extend it beyond that. But, there are things drivers often do that cause the battery to die early. Learn how to care for your battery and be rewarded with a long battery life.

1. Limit short rides

Shorts distance trips prevent your car’s battery from a full charge cycle. Over the long run, this will reduce the charge capacity of the battery and its lifespan. Instead, go for a long distance drive once a week during the weekend to give the battery a full charge it deserves.

2. Once a month routine inspection

Battery terminals corrode over time, but keeping them clean from buildup is a great way to extend the life of your car battery. Scrub the terminals with a toothbrush dipped in a baking soda and water mixture. Then, using a spray bottle with cold water, rinse the mixture off and follow up with a thorough drying with a clean cloth.

3. Don’t use electronics when idle

Turn off functions like the radio or air conditioner when your engine isn’t running to put less wear and tear on your battery power. Extended periods of idling also can wear a battery down. And not to forget, don’t charge your smartphone before starting your car’s engine.

4. Keep Your Battery Tightly Fastened

A battery that’s not securely fastened could end up vibrating, potentially resulting in internal damage and short circuits. Have your battery terminal checked regularly, especially if you frequently drive on bumpy roads.

5. Check your car’s alternator

If your alternator is bad it will results in ineffective recharging of your battery and dramatically shorten your battery’s lifespan.

 

Source: Carput

Tyre Pressure

March 8, 2018 / 0 Comments / 104 / Blog
Maintaining the correct tyre pressure will help to extend the life of your tyres, improve vehicle safety and maintain fuel efficiency.

Car tyre pressure is measured by calculating the amount of air that has been pumped into the inner lining of your tyre in pounds per square inch (PSI) or BAR pressure.

The manufacturer of your vehicle will specify the suitable pressure for your tyres, and it is your responsibility as the driver to make sure that the pressure is checked and corrected on a regular basis. We recommend doing this every two weeks to ensure optimum tyre pressure.

Tyre Pressure

Under inflated tyres

Tyres can quickly become underinflated if you don’t check them regularly. Under inflated tyres will have uneven contact with the road and will exhibit excessive wear on the inside and outside edges of the tread if they are left underinflated for some time. Not only does low tyre pressure wear your tyres out more quickly but you may also experience increased rolling resistance with the road which means reduced fuel efficiency and increased CO2 emissions.

Over inflated tyres

Putting too much air in your tyres can be just as damaging and costly. Over inflated tyres will have a smaller contact patch – the part of the tyre that makes contact with the road – which can lead to a loss of traction and poorer braking distances. Overly high tyre pressure will also cause heavy and uneven wear across the central part of the tyre leading to shorter tyre lifespans than if it was correctly inflated.

Correct tyre pressures

It’s not always apparent that air is being lost from your tyres, but it generally escapes at the rate of up to two PSI of air every month. More air is usually lost during warm weather, so more regular checks are needed when temperatures rise.

You can find the recommended tyre pressure for your vehicle in your vehicle handbook or printed either in the sill of the driver’s door or on the inside of the fuel tank flap. Your vehicle manufacturer may suggest different tyre pressures for your front and rear tyres so make sure you aware of these guidelines.

 

Sources:KwikFit

Tyre Rotation Advice

January 4, 2018 / 0 Comments / 183 / Blog

Rotating your tyres periodically can help to prevent uneven wear and prolong the lifespan of your tyres.

 

Rotating Tyres: Best Practise

When should you rotate your tyres? Generally speaking, it is recommended that you rotate the tyres on your vehicle once every six months, or 6,000 miles – whichever comes first.

To do so, each tyres need to be removed and refitted at a different position. This helps to ensure that each tyre wears evenly and lasts longer.

For each driving method, there is a correct way to rotate your tyres. You want to ensure that you rotate the tyres to the correct position for your vehicle.

 

Rotating Tyres on a Front Wheel Drive

tyre-rotation-fwd

The two front tyres stay on the same of the car and are transferred to the rear. However, the rear tyres move forward and switch sides.

 

Rotating Tyres on a Rear Wheel Drive

tyre-rotation-rwd

The two rear tyres stay on the same side of the car and are transferred to the front. However, the front tyres move backwards and switch sides.

 

Rotating Tyres on a Four Wheel Drive

tyre-rotation-4wd
In this instance both sets of tyres swap sides and position. So the two front tyres move back and switch. At the same time the two rear tyres move forward and switch.

 

Rotating Directional Tyres

The above rules should not be followed if your tyres are ‘directional tyres’. The tread pattern on this variety tyre is designed specifically to work in a certain way in relation to its position on the vehicle – switching sides would be dangerous.

tyre-rotation-directional
The tyres change position, but do not switch. The two front tyres move back and the two rear tyres move forward – they stay on the same side of the car as before.

 

Source: blackcircle.com

What Does An Engine Oil Really Do?

May 5, 2017 / 0 Comments / 241 / Blog

Lubricants secure the functionality of the engine and are considered elements of construction in engine development. Your engine is a complex machine with hundreds of moving parts that operate under a wide range of temperatures and stressors. The oil you select needs to be equally capable of coping with these operating conditions to protect your engine against wear, corrosion, and the build-up of dirt and deposits.

Lubricants heavily influence:

  • Performance

  • Fuel consumption

  • Emissions

Lubricants are responsible for:

  • Wear protection

  • Engine cleanliness

  • Long engine life

Finding lubricants? Click Here

Source: Mobil 1 Malaysia

Tyre Balancing

May 5, 2017 / 0 Comments / 254 / Blog

balancing

Distinct from tire alignment, tyre or wheel balancing refers to compensation for any weight imbalances in the tyre/wheel combination and is often performed in conjunction with wheel alignment. There are two basic types of tire/wheel imbalance that need correction – static (single plane) and dynamic (dual plane).

Static balance addresses balance on only one plane – vertical movement which can cause vibration. A dynamic imbalance, on the other hand, addresses balance in two planes – vertical movement and lateral movement. Both types of imbalance require the use of a special balancing machine to help even things out.

To begin balancing your tyres, a technician will mount them on the correct rims and adjust the pressure to optimal inflation. Then each tyre goes on the center bore of a balancing machine. The machine spins the tire at a high speed to measure the wheel/tyre combination imbalance. It signals how much weight the tech should add to balance out the tire and the areas where said weight is needed.

Tyre balancing is essential for proper tire care for the same reason as wheel alignment: prevention of premature tread wear. Having tyres aligned and balanced every 5,000 to 6,000 miles can help maximize their lifespan and overall performance.

If you need tyre balancing, kindly click here to find our HOOF centre that are nearby you.
Source: Bridgestone

What Is Tyre Alignment?

May 5, 2017 / 0 Comments / 234 / Blog

Tire alignment, also known as wheel alignment, can help your tires perform properly and help them last longer. It can also improve handling and keep your vehicle from pulling in one direction or vibrating strangely on the road.

Alignment refers to an adjustment of a vehicle’s suspension – the system that connects a vehicle to its wheels. It is not an adjustment of the tires or wheels themselves. The key to proper alignment is adjusting the angles of the tires which affects how they make contact with the road.

Alignment

If you’ve noticed one or more of these indicators, you should have your alignment checked by clicking here to find our HOOF centre that are nearby you.

  • Uneven tread wear
  • Vehicle pulling to the left or right
  • Your steering wheel is off center when driving straight
  • Steering wheel vibration

Source: Bridgestone

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